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Posts Tagged ‘Madame Secretary Clinton’

Hillary’s new photo shoot for ‘Elle’ Magazine…

In Hillary Clinton Unleashed, HILLARY FOR PRESIDENT, Madame Secretary Hillary Clinton on April 6, 2012 at 7:10 pm


Hillary Clinton Talks Women, Work-Life Balance

Rachel Combe’s profile of Hillary Clinton in the May 2012 issue of Elle opens with an anecdote in which Clinton compliments Combe’s evening shoes. You could view that as another instance of a women’s magazine stereotypically lightening up a female political figure, but to Combe’s credit and Elle‘s, this is not a “light” piece. It is an homage — and an argument that we are meeting a new Hillary. Combe describes herself as a Clinton supporter and spends a good chunk of the piece chronicling the decline of “Hilary hating”: “These days Hillary Clinton seems to get standing ovations whenever she opens her mouth.”

And about the shoe comment: Combe also addresses the over-attention paid to Clinton’s appearance through the years. “Supporters will often wail for everyone to stop focusing on Clinton’s hair and clothes and listen to her ideas, but that’s sort of a backhanded compliment. (People, she’s too smart to care that she looks like crap.) The truth is, Clinton does care (she’s a bottle blond! Do you know how much work that is?)” Fair point.

For me the most interesting moment in the piece came when Clinton addressed how women with more than one child can’t possibly achieve the level of success she has — or that men do.

“Look at Nancy Pelosi! She had five children…. People — especially young women — need to rid their minds of this baggage that has been inherited. Because you can unfortunately caricature anybody: ‘Oh, she’s the woman who never wanted to get married and have children.’ Well, you don’t know what her life is like. Or, ‘She’s the woman who gave up her career and stayed home.’ Well, maybe that’s what she found most fulfilling. We have got to get beyond all of that pigeonholing.”

The beginning of the quote is slightly misleading — Pelosi didn’t enter politics until after she’d had those five children, though she was still raising some of them while in office — and Combe doesn’t mention what a 180 the comment on women giving up their careers is from the Hillary we knew 20 years ago, the one who said on Nightline in 1992 –“I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies” — and thereby repelled American homemakers.

But this is very much a portrait of the new Hillary, the one who takes time out of her day to talk to reporters about an aide’s new baby and alludes to her own pregnancy. According to Combe, “the row of male wire reporters nodded their heads, looking a shade terrified. (Oh my God, is Hillary Clinton about to tell us about her C-section?)” This is the Clinton Combe describes as “a middle-class girl, from the middle of the country, born in the middle of the last century. Clinton is, at her core, still a good girl.” Her reaction to Bill Clinton’s philandering, according to Combe, resonated with “regular Americans” because “betrayal in marriage is common, and finding the empathy for your partner and confidence in yourself to forgive and rebuild can be admirable.” This Clinton is less political. She’s just helping girls save the world.

The shift in persona Combe presents doesn’t exactly jibe with the way Clinton describes herself elsewhere in the piece, “There’s a certain consistency to who I am and what I do, and I think people have finally said, ‘Well, you know, I kinda get her now.’ I’ve actually had people say that to me.”

Thus, the profile didn’t convince me that New Hillary is the real thing. The narrative did seem to possess a crucial element that could help Clinton win in 2016 (if, contrary to everything she and everyone connected to her has said, she decides to run). The New Hillary could move people. Exhibit A: Combe herself, who wrote that she wanted Clinton to win in 2008 (and wants her to run again) to show her daughter what is possible. That’s the kind of sentiment that wins elections.

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Hillary should be the democratic nominee… Obama should Opt-Out..

In Democratic Party, Draft Hillary, HILLARY 2012, HILLARY FOR PRESIDENT, HILLARY in 2012, Human Rights, Presidential Election, Smart Power, United States on December 13, 2011 at 7:30 am

If Americans in their infinite wisdom choose to keep a Democrat in the White House through 2016, let it be Hillary Clinton.

Increasingly the question of whether President Obama should be challenged for the 2012 nomination is surfacing among disgruntled Democrats worried about a solid Republican victory next fall.

They’re right to be concerned: the crises facing the United States and the world deserve better than Obama’s oldest established permanent floating re-election campaign.

There’s no doubt Clinton’s tireless and often effective performance as secretary of state demonstrates she would bring more seasoned judgment to the Oval Office than its current resident. Here are a just a few reasons the Democratic Party should bite the bullet and jettison the nation’s one-term Senate orator and try to elect the nation’s first woman president.

Beginning with the political dimension of his conduct of the war in Afghanistan to class war at home, Obama’s priorities seem to be governed more by his re-election timetable than the demands of the national interest and reflective responses to the galloping changes in the global order

Contrary to mainstream opinion, Obama is a mediocre politician. Were it not so, surely he would have known that people get wise to polished repetitive, but empty speeches — and know the difference between bread and butter now and pie in the sky later.

Joblessness and fear of watching retirement savings vanish weigh heavier on the nation’s collective mind than long-range climate change and health care reform. The president’s touted political instincts should have told him all that. But, as James Carville once noted so cogently, “It’s the economy, stupid!”

But while Obama talked jobs and initiated a jobs bill on his sixth day in office, almost all of his mind and determination remained focused on health care — his overriding priority.

There is more. Even a short and substantively fruitless effort in spring 2009 to get agreement on a new U.N. climate change protocol outranked jobs at home on Obama’s must-do list.

Health care came first, no matter what. The president spent a year getting it on the books, while he assured the country that his close to trillion-dollar economic stimulus program was creating jobs.

He lost no time proclaiming the recession over — blind and deaf to the reality that it was a “jobless recovery.” He saw the upticking Gross National Product statistics and forgot or never understood they reflected only record earnings of financial institutions.

Hillary Clinton with her wealth of experience as first lady, a two-term senator from New York and now the world’s leading diplomat would hardly have been so blind.

Obama’s economic stimulus was a bust because, among his many other blunders, he left the writing of the legislation to Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats in their veto-proof Congress — without benefit of Republican input. As a result, Congress presented him with a Christmas tree adorned with pork barrels, but bare of jobs with a future.

. Her party — and her country — badly need her services. She’s likely the only potential winner the Democrats can muster.

Bogdan Kipling is a Canadian journalist in Washington.

Hillary says: ” I LOVE PARIS “…

In Friends of Libya, Madame Secretary Hillary Clinton, Paris on September 1, 2011 at 10:34 pm

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives at Elysee Palace in Paris, prior to the start of the "Friends of Libya" conference, September 1, 2011. Leaders of the Libyan uprising that overthrew Muammar Gaddafi met with world powers in Paris on Thursday to map out the country's rebuilding, 42 years to the day after the former strongman seized power in a coup. The Friends of Libya conference is expected to have 50 delegations attending to discuss the future of the country and offer some concrete aid to the transitional council.

‘All the Time’…


Bonus: this just in…

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September 1, 2011

Clintons Hunkered Down in East Hampton as Irene Passed By

By BARBARA GRAUSTARK

EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. — Over the years, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Bill Clinton have been occasional visitors to the serene, breezy corner of East Hampton where Lily Pond Lane meets Georgica Beach amid the bayberry and beach plum. Sometimes they were guests of Steven Spielberg. But this is the first time that neighbors had seen them not as casual day visitors but as householders.

Five days before Irene struck, neighbors say, the Clintons and their Secret Service entourage put down roots in a large-shingle 1920 “cottage” on Lily Pond Lane with commanding views of the ocean and Lily Pond. The house is owned by Eli Hirschfeld, son of the parking lot magnate Abe Hirschfeld, and surrounded by black pines and Rosa rugosa.

Even as their neighbors evacuated, some returning to Manhattan, the Clintons decided to wait out Tropical Storm Irene, convinced, Mrs. Clinton told a neighbor, that it would weaken.

It did eventually weaken, but the Clintons’ house, like most along this beach, lost power.

Ever since Irene passed, the pair has been seen strolling the pristine beach, shadowed at a respectful distance by Secret Service agents, commiserating with neighbors about power failures, downed trees and walkways washed out by the storm.

On Wednesday, they were walking holding hands, Bill in his khaki long shorts and Hillary almost hidden beneath a pink hat and turquoise shirt, as the steps to the Hirschfeld house were being reconstructed, said Curtis Eaves, owner of a landscape design firm. The couple stopped for a photo-op.


The Clintons have apparently recovered power in at least part of the house. Mrs. Clinton told Mr. Eaves that as long as they had power in the kitchen, and phone service, “we weren’t going anywhere.”

Mr. Clinton was not complaining about a few days in a beach house without lights. “Everything is relative,” he told Mr. Eaves. “I’m worried about the people who were flooded and lost their homes.”

LINK

Clinton: ‘We’re Going To Weather This Crisis’

In Global News, Madame Secretary Hillary Clinton, Syria's Assad, United States on August 13, 2011 at 5:48 am

8/12/11
“I’m confident that we’re going to weather this crisis, and not just our own country, because I think that we have very strong reasons to be confident, but I think also, our partners around the world, most particularly in Europe,” she told CBS Evening News.

QUESTION: Thank you, Madam Secretary. You are in close coordination with all of the European Union countries, and I wonder how much confidence you have that the European nations are going to be able to create a soft landing for their debt crisis that doesn’t wreck the economy here in the United States?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, Scott, I think it’s very clear that the global economy has made us even more interdependent, and we’ve seen that in so many ways over the last three years. We are certainly supporting what the Europeans are trying to do. Our Treasury Secretary and other officials are in constant communication with their counterparts. Obviously, the President has spoken with his, and I’ve spoken with mine. And this is a very challenging economic time for many of us, but I believe that we’ll see actions taken that will provide the so-called soft landing that you’re talking about.

And I think we do have to all pay more attention to how we’re going to create jobs in the so-called developed world that are going to be available for the vast majority of middle-income and lower-income men and women, who are being basically marginalized in the way the global economy is growing.

more details at link:

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Hillary Clinton Asks Tougher Sanctions Against Assad Regime-
Urges Further Sanctions as Syrian Violence Continues

Activists and witnesses say Syrian security forces shot and killed at least 19 people across the country on Friday during anti-government protests. The reports say protesters were killed in at least six Syrian cities, including Hama, Homs and Aleppo, as well as the suburbs of Damascus.

Forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad have intensified their violent suppression of opposition protests during the past week, despite growing international condemnation.

On Friday, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged countries giving Syria economic and political support to “get on the right side of history.” She also called on countries to stop buying Syrian oil and gas.

Clinton says she is continuing diplomatic talks aimed at putting political pressure on Mr. Assad’s government. She again insisted the Syrian president has “lost the legitimacy to lead,” but still stopped short of calling for Mr. Assad to step down, saying that calls for his removal should be part of an international effort.

Meanwhile, Turkish President Abdullah Gul called on Mr. Assad to implement reforms before it is too “late.” Turkish media reports relayed Mr. Gul’s comments on Friday.

The Syrian government has defended its crackdown, saying it is combating armed gangs and terrorists. On Friday, state-run news reports said “armed groups” with “snipers” had opened fire “randomly” in a Damascus suburb and two other areas, killing three law enforcement officers and two civilians.

Rights groups say more than 1,700 people have been killed in Syria’s crackdown.

Details of events in Syria are difficult to independently verify because the government allows very few foreign news reporters into the country and restricts their movements.
Link

Clinton vows to pay off Women’s World Cup bet with Japan’s Foreign Minister…

In Madame Secretary Hillary Clinton, Women's WORLD SOCCER on July 23, 2011 at 1:23 pm

BALI, Indonesia (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is lamenting America’s loss to Japan in the Women’s World Cup final, but congratulating the Japanese team on its victory and vowing to pay off a bet she made on the match with Japan’s foreign minister.

Meeting with her Japanese and South Korean counterparts on the sidelines of an Asian security conference in Bali, Indonesia, on Saturday, Clinton applauded Japan’s “hard fought victory” in last week’s finale, which she called a “great game.” “We were not happy with the result but we were very impressed by the Japanese team,” she said.

Clinton then said she would make good on her bet, which she noted had cost her “some very good New York apples.” Japan’s foreign minister had staked Japanese pears.

Oprah’s decline began with backstabbing Hillary Clinton…

In Smart Power, Woman of the Year on May 29, 2011 at 5:21 pm

 

Hillary v. Oprah — Oprah won the battle, but Hillary won the war

She who laughs last, laughs best. Oprah helped Obama win the Presidency over Hillary in 2008. But now Oprah's show is finished -- while Hillary is still rising. Flanked by George Mitchell after Obama spoke at the State Department on May 19, 2011 Credit: Getty Images

Looking happier than ever. Hillary is now the most accomplished woman in the history of American politics. Walking with British Foreign Secretary William Hague in London, May 25, 2011. Credit: Getty Images

Oprah went off the air this week with much fanfare. The hoopla — though annoying to some — was well-earned. Oprah’s rise from a dirt poor and abusive childhood to the most powerful woman in the entertainment biz epitomizes the American Dream. She has mothered millions and changed lives with her philanthropy.

Truly, Oprah Winfrey is a woman to celebrate. That’s why it’s especially sad that her lapse of judgment in 2008 ran her off the air so quickly. Oprah endorsed Barack Obama over Hillary Clinton in 2008. Women – especially the middle class white women who formed her core audience – felt betrayed.

Oprah had never forayed into politics before – and her first foray was to kneecap Hillary Clinton, a hero for middle and working class women. Some have suggested that Oprah’s endorsement put Obama over the top; he would not be President without her, which is a testament to her power.

Unsurprisingly, Republicans and Clinton Democrats were not impressed. In the wake of helping Obama win the White House, Oprah saw her favorability ratings and the ratings for her once-dominant television show drop.

No doubt Oprah saw the writing on wall and decided to end her show before the bottom fell completely out. It did not have to be this way. But Oprah’s disgraceful dismissal of Hillary’s candidacy and consequent demise ranks as yet another example of the curious series of downfalls now afflicting so many 2008 Hillary backstabbers.

Oprah may be the most powerful woman in American entertainment — but Hillary Rodham Clinton is still the most powerful and admired woman in the world.

http://www.examiner.com/post-partisan-in-national/hillary-v-oprah-oprah-won-the-battle-but-hillary-won-the-war-picture#slide=33738011

Hillary, a confident, radiant representative of the US of A…

In Obama on May 6, 2011 at 12:50 pm

Hillary visits Tokyo in support of Japan….

In Japan, Madame Secretary Clinton on April 17, 2011 at 9:57 am

Japanese Foreign Minister Takeaki Matsumoto shakes hands with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton prior to meeting at the Iikura Guest House in Tokyo, April 17, 2011. AFP PHOTO / POOL / Saul LOEB

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Sunday that America would stand by Japan, saying she was confident the country will fully recover from its tsunami and nuclear disasters.

“We are very confident that Japan will recover and will be a very strong economic and global player for years and decades to come,” Clinton told Prime Minister Naoto Kan during a brief visit to Tokyo intended as a morale boost to the crucial U.S. ally.

Kan thanked Clinton for U.S. help with the crises triggered by a magnitude-9.0 earthquake on March 11 that unleashed a massive tsunami, wrecking cooling and power systems at a nuclear plant that has been leaking radiation ever since.

“We will never forget and we will keep in our memory that the U.S. has provided such robust support,” said Kan, in comments suggesting the aid has helped soothe friction over an American military base in Okinawa that forced his predecessor, Yukio Hatoyama, to resign last year.

Relief operations mounted by American soldiers after the earthquake and tsunami helped show a new and welcome face for troops the Japanese have hosted — sometimes grudgingly — for decades.

Roughly 20,000 U.S. troops were mobilized in “Operation Tomodachi,” or “Friend,” the biggest bilateral humanitarian mission the U.S. has conducted in Japan. The U.S. is also helping Japan cope with its nuclear crisis.

Kan has pledged to beef up disaster preparedness and make his top priority resolving the crisis at the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.

Tokyo Electric Power Co., the operator of the plant, announced Sunday a plan to bring the crisis under control within six to nine months, aiming to end radiation leaks that have forced the evacuation of tens of thousands of people.

“We would like to see evacuees return to their homes as early as possible,” said TEPCO Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata.

Clinton said Foreign Minister Takeaki Matsumoto, who she met with earlier, told her that Japan hoped for U.S. feedback on the plan.

“The constant efforts to respond to the situation at Fukushima have required intense analysis by Japanese, American and international experts, and we have been very supportive of what Japan is doing to take the appropriate steps,” she said.

Clinton and Matsumoto announced the formation of a public-private partnership to encourage investment in the recovery effort. The aim is to keep American businesses interested in Japan by demonstrating its ability to bounce back from daunting natural disasters.

“There has been a great outpouring of concern, sympathy and admiration for the great resilience and spirit the Japanese people have shown throughout this very difficult experience,” Clinton said.

Clinton, who called Japan’s well-being a “bedrock priority,” also met with the Japanese emperor and empress. She was due to return to the U.S. later Sunday.

“I am so, so sorry for everything your country is going through. If there is anything we can do …” Clinton said to Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, who have been visiting evacuation centers near Tokyo and plan visits to areas hardest hit by the disasters in coming weeks.

http://washingtonexaminer.com/news/world/2011/04/clinton-visits-tokyo-show-support-japan

Secretary Clinton Marks 60th Anniversary of Refugee Convention

In Help for Refugees, Human Rights, Humanitarian Aide, Madame Secretary Clinton on April 6, 2011 at 10:07 pm

 

Courage and Bravery in the interests of Humanity are alive and well.

Libyan opposition leaders to meet with Hillary in Paris today…

In Global News, Human Rights, Libya, Paris, United States on March 14, 2011 at 7:24 pm

Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton arrived in Paris Monday to meet with Libyan opposition figures and European leaders to try and make plans to stop Moammar Gadhafi. She will meet the Libyan opposition figures as the Obama administration makes its first high-level contact with foes of Moammar Gadhafi.

Libya opposition to meet with Clinton in Paris today

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will continue on to Egypt and Tunisia in her first trip to address the Arab revolutions. But the window for foreign assistance to Libya is quickly closing.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is set to meet with Libyan rebel leaders in Paris today in her first overseas trip to address Arab world revolutions since the ousting of former Tunisian president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Her visit comes as the Obama administration shows wariness about offering support to Libyan rebels and Col. Muammar Qaddafi’s forces make surprising gains.

In Paris, Clinton will meet with Libyan opposition figures and meet several European counterparts to discuss military intervention in Libya, the Associated Press reports. France has already recognized the Libyan opposition interim council and, together with Britain, is drafting a no-fly zone resolution to put forward at the United Nations Security Council. But the US has been more reticent to throw its full support behind the rebels.

AP notes that the US regard for rebels “may well depend” on Clinton’s meetings today, since “the [rebel] council’s composition and aims largely remain a mystery to American officials.”

Clinton is due to visit Tunisia and Egypt after Paris to express support for the ousters of autocratic governments there. “We have an enormous stake in ensuring that Egypt and Tunisia provide models for the kind of democracy that we want to see,” Clinton told lawmakers last week, warning them about Iran’s attempts to gain influence across the region, according to the Agence France-Presse.

Even though the Arab League offered a strongly-worded statement of support this weekend for an internationally backed no-fly zone over Libya, saying that the Libyan government had “lost its sovereignty,” Obama on Sunday showed hesitation in committing the US to military action in Libya.

“Anytime I send United States forces into a potentially hostile situation, there are risks involved and there are consequences. And it is my job as president to make sure that we have considered all those risks,” he told reporters, according to the Associated Press. “It’s also important from a political perspective to, as much as possible, maintain the strong international coalition that we have right now.”

The Obama administration has expressed concern about a military that is already spread thin and about being perceived as meddling in another country’s affairs. It has insisted that any military intervention have UN approval and support from the Arab League.

Meanwhile, Qaddafi’s forces have made surprisingly strong gains against rebels, even advancing toward the opposition “capital” of Benghazi in eastern Libya.

After pummeling the key oil town of Ras Lanuf last week, pro-Qaddafi forces moved east to claim Brega over the weekend. Rebels say the next battle will be in Ajdabiya, a strategic town on a junction that leads to both the oil refineries of Tobruk and the self-made rebel stronghold of Benghazi, the Guardian reports.

Although the rebel forces commander said Qaddafi’s forces will face a difficult fight if they try to reclaim Ajdabiya, some members of the antigovernment forces seemed less confident, bemoaning a lack of assistance from other countries and discussing exit plans to Egypt.

According to the Washington Post, reporting from Tripoli, pro-government forces tout reclaiming of oil town Ras Lanuf and Brega as a significant gain. The rebel forces commanders claims his forces made a “strategic retreat” from Brega.

Col. Milad Hussein, an army spokesman, [said] that he did not anticipate a tough battle in Benghazi. He said that the government hopes to resolve the crisis “through reconciliation” with tribal leaders in eastern Libya but that the rebel movement is not proving to be a potent adversary.

“To deal with them you don’t need full-scale military action,” the Libyan spokesman said. “They are groups of people who, when you come to them, they just raise their hands and go. ”

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/terrorism-security/2011/0314/Libya-opposition-to-meet-with-Clinton-in-Paris-today