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Former Secretary Of State Hillary Rodham Clinton To Speak At Newsweek & The Daily Beast’s Women In The World Summit

In HILLARY 2016, Hillary Clinton Unleashed, Madame Secretary Clinton on March 23, 2013 at 1:14 pm

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton joins Tina Brown, Meryl Streep, Dr. Hawa Abdi, Tom Hanks, Oprah Winfrey, and Diane von Furstenberg for Fourth Annual Summit April 4th and 5th at Lincoln Center

NEW YORK, March 21, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will be joining Newsweek & The Daily Beast’s Women in the World summit on April 4th and 5th at Lincoln Center. The annual summit, now in its fourth year, illuminates global issues through the voices of leaders, activists, artists, and pioneers who are confronting the most urgent challenges faced by women and girls around the world.

Joining Tina Brown as summit co-hosts are Diane von Furstenberg, Meryl Streep, Ai-jen Poo, Melanne Verveer, Julie Hamp, Dr. Hawa Abdi, Maya Harris, Nizan Guanaes, Jane Harman & Lauren Bush Lauren.

Other inspiring, trailblazing women who have confirmed their participation in this year’s program include Oprah Winfrey, Ambassador Susan E. Rice, Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy, Ambassador Sherry Rehman, Dr. Mamphela Ramphele, Eva Longoria, Ping Fu, and America Ferrera. The summit will also feature a special tribute to Nora Ephron by Tom Hanks.

This year’s summit will feature Pakistan’s young women fighting for education, new eyewitnesses to the atrocities in Syria, Latina leaders on the rise in American business and politics, and leading voices from the outcry in India to end violence against women.

To close the summit on the evening of April 5th, Diane von Furstenberg and Tina Brown will once again host the DVF Awards at the UN, recognizing and supporting courageous women who are using their resources, commitment and visibility to transform the lives of other women.

SOURCE Newsweek & The Daily Beast

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/former-secretary-of-state-hillary-rodham-clinton-to-speak-at-newsweek–the-daily-beasts-women-in-the-world-summit-199418621.html

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SOS HILLARY CLINTON, headliner CLINTON GLOBAL INITIATIVE…

In Clinton Legacy, Madame Secretary Clinton, Madame Secretary Hillary Clinton on September 25, 2012 at 9:34 am

 

Hillary Clinton On Smart Diplomacy And Development For The 21st Century

September 24, 2012

by Penelope Chester, reporting-

Topics: Clinton Global Initiative; Hillary Clinton;, Diplomacy, Human Rights, U.S. Politics

The Clintons took over the stage this morning at the Clinton Global Initiative. Bill introduced Hillary, who got not one, but two standing ovations from the crowd. Kicking off the day’s proceedings, Secretary of State Clinton spoke about designing diplomacy for the 21st century. Her speech was focused on how the United States can deploy smart diplomacy strategies, that work alongside development and defense, to consolidate American interests across the world.

Clinton began by mentioning that we live in times of great change. Indeed, new technologies, significant demographic shifts – both in the developing and the developed world – revolutions and democratic transitions, and a global financial crisis that has contributed to reshaping world economies are complex realities global diplomacy has to take into account. “In the face of all this change,” Clinton said, “those who care about having an impact need to think and act innovatively.” She added that we must also “be willing to change ourselves to keep pace with the change around us, and stay true to our values, or we will lose our way.” From this broad statement, she went on to speak specifically about the benefits of elevating development and incorporating it into a global engagement strategy for the United States, together with diplomacy and defense.

Secretary Clinton spoke about how the Obama administration has done just that, and how development aid is being re-thought. In the past, “we focused on urgent and immediate needs at the expense of the long term”, Clinton said. She talked about how development aid dollars used to represent a much more significant proportion of the funds that flowed into developing nations. But, today, because of the dramatic increase in capital, remittances, trade and other flows, “we have to spend dollars differently.” And indeed, development aid should be in tune with the realities of the 21st century. Clinton mentioned how it used to be the case that development dollars needed to be spent on providing food assistance, helping building schools and in other basic areas when governments weren’t able to. Nowadays, however, given how different the global picture is, it’s necessary for development dollars to be invested in smart ways, so it can be leveraged for political change and sustainable growth.

“We want to move from aid to investment,” Clinton said. “Today, with new resources, development has to fit into a more dynamic economic picture”, she added, saying that development aid should be “a catalyst for sustainable growth and progress.” Building on World Bank president Jim Kim’s remarks yesterday about how the private sector should talk to the World Bank about investment opportunities in the developing world, Clinton said that one of the roles that American development can play is to “help mitigate and reduce investment risk.” Driving the point home, Clinton said that, today, the United States is not “just providing aid to people in crisis; we’re making strategic investments.”

Clinton painted a very modern picture of what development aid should be, and how it needs to move beyond traditional aid and working with traditional NGO partners. She spoke about how development intersects with business opportunities, and how “we need the private sector to give new economies opportunities.”

Clinton then spent some time defining what she believes “country ownership” – a jargon-y development buzzword – means. She started by clarifying what country ownership doesn’t mean: “it doesn’t mean that donors are supposed to keep money flowing while recipients decide how to spend it; it doesn’t mean shutting out the voices of civil society and faith-based groups; it doesn’t mean not letting beneficiaries do everything on their own.”

For Clinton, country ownership means that development should be “lead, implemented and increasingly paid for by government, civil society and other groups.” It means that developing countries need to “set priorities, manage resources, develop their own plans and carry them out.” She also mentioned that, in her view, country ownership means that “the whole country – men and women” are involved. “When more women enter the workforce, it spurs innovation and grows the economy – in short, everyone benefits.”

In the part of her remarks that sounded the most like a campaign speech, Clinton listed some of the development and diplomacy accomplishments of the Obama administration which further the goals detailed above: the ambitious reform of USAID under Raj Shah, the Feed the Future initiative, the development of “groundbreaking renewable energy investment vehicles” in Africa, public-private partnerships such as the Clean Cookstove Initiative. “But there is still a lot of work to do, and this is where you come in”, the Secretary of State said, speaking directly to the audience – one of her husband’s favorite rhetorical devices.

Clinton spoke of the need of development policy to invest more deeply in a broader range of partners, beyond traditional international NGOs. She spoke of the need to broaden and increase our network of partnerships to advance our work in development. “Let’s start viewing all of our separate efforts as a portfolio of complimentary investments,” Clinton exhorted, “let’s redouble our commitment to multi-partner approaches that bring all of us together.”Her speech then shifted to a more classic political speech – mentioning the need for the United States to advance freedom, rights and dignity across the world, the rejection of violence and underscoring American efforts in supporting democratic transitions in the Middle East. “We need your help and leadership”, Clinton told the audience, to spread development, dignity and freedom.

This is an important forum for Hillary Clinton to address – indeed, some of the world’s most powerful business, NGO and political leaders gather at the Clinton Global Initiative every year to discuss and explore partnership opportunities, something which is frankly only possible when Bill Clinton brings all these stakeholders together for meaningful engagement. The Secretary of State’s speech made clear that the United States and Americans need to rethink their approach to development aid: multisectoral, investment-based and results-oriented with the ultimate objectives of sustainability and long-term growth. While many of the people at the Clinton Global Initiative already know this, Hillary Clinton’s speech served to give these efforts broader meaning in the context of American foreign policy and the advancement of American goals and interests worldwide.

Photo credit: Clinton Global Initiative

LINK

Head of State: Hillary Clinton

In Diplomacy, Draft Hillary, Madame President HILLARY CLINTON 2012, Madame Secretary Clinton, Secretart of State Hillary Clinton, United States on August 6, 2012 at 8:56 pm

 

Hillary Clinton, the blind dissident, and the art of diplomacy in the Twitter era.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sat down on a plush yellow couch at the J.W. Marriott late on a Saturday morning in early May. The Beijing skyline sparkled, uncharacteristically sunny and smog-free, out the window of her 23rd-floor suite, and she was wearing sunglasses even though we were indoors, “an eye infection,” she said apologetically. Clinton seemed surprisingly upbeat, especially considering that just a day earlier, she had come uncomfortably close to a major public rebuff by the Chinese — much closer, in fact, than anyone yet realized. “It was a standoff,” she told me, “for 24 difficult hours.”

Until our conversation, Clinton had said virtually nothing publicly about the case of Chen Guangcheng, the blind Chinese dissident whose fate had become the object of a week of frenetic negotiations when his escape from village house arrest to the U.S. Embassy collided with a visit to Beijing by Clinton herself. Amid the unfolding drama, the secretary had smiled and nodded her way through elaborately choreographed high-level annual talks and a variety of photo ops at which she gamely recited paeans to constructive dialogue and plugged cut-rate cookstoves for the developing world.

But Clinton had in fact spent the last few days in hard-nosed deal-making with the Chinese that nearly ended in an embarrassing failure, until she personally intervened, twice, with her counterpart, Chinese State Councilor Dai Bingguo: the first time to reassure Dai about a deal to allow Chen to stay in China and study law; then, when Chen balked at that, to secure agreement that he and his family could leave for the United States. “We were in a very difficult position because we had pushed their system just about to the breaking point,” recalled a senior official who was present. “We knew it, they knew it, and they knew we knew it.”

Her final encounter with Dai came, at her request, in an early-morning session in a room at the Diaoyutai compound where, 40 years earlier, Nixon had stayed when he famously met Mao to reopen U.S.-China relations. It was just hours before the close of the formal Strategic and Economic Dialogue that was the ostensible purpose of Clinton’s trip; if Clinton had no agreement by then, they both knew it would open a rift in their relationship and create a political disaster back in Washington, where the secretary and her team were being accused of fumbling an important human rights case by delivering the sick dissident to a Beijing hospital and right back into the hands of his persecutors.

Still, the Chinese did not give in. At one point, an advisor who was present recalled, Clinton finally seemed to catch their attention by mentioning what a political circus the case had become — with Chen even dialing into a U.S. congressional hearing that Thursday by cell phone from his hospital bed to say he feared for his safety if he remained in China. The Chinese team was visibly surprised. Eventually, Dai agreed at least to let the negotiations proceed. A few hours later, exhausted U.S. officials announced a deal.

By the next morning when we met, it was already clear this had been the most intense high-stakes diplomacy of Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state. She had worked hard to rescue Chen without blowing up the American relationship with China, but it was not yet obvious whether she had accomplished either goal. The Chinese were furious about the embarrassing attention to their human rights abuses. Clinton and her aides were being pilloried at home by everyone from Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney to the human rights community for abandoning Chen at the hospital. And the secretary was still worried about the deal. “Until he’s actually out and up with his family,” she told me, “it’s still touch and go.”

Listening to Clinton recount the episode, it was hard not to think of her own journey from idealistic human rights crusader to hardheaded global diplomat. Back in 1995, on her first trip to Beijing as first lady, Clinton’s impassioned speech declaring “women’s rights are human rights” was so inflammatory the Chinese blacked out the broadcast. By 2009, when she made her first visit as secretary of state, she was determined to avoid that kind of controversy — so determined, in fact, that she created one by declaring that human rights was just one of many issues she would raise with her Chinese counterparts.

continued… more:

Head of State

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton to Receive Transparency International-USA’s Integrity Award

In Award, foreign policy, Global News, Hillary Clinton Unleashed, HILLARY FOR PRESIDENT, Madame Secretary Clinton, United States, Washington on March 22, 2012 at 9:10 pm

Notice to the Press
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
March 21, 2012

On March 22, Secretary Clinton will receive Transparency International-USA’s Integrity Award. Transparency International-USA (TI-USA) is an international leader in anti-corruption advocacy in government, business, and development assistance. TI-USA’s Integrity Award recognizes Secretary Clinton’s efforts to promote transparency and integrity around the world. The event will begin at approximately 7:30 p.m.

Secretary Clinton will be honored for her leadership in drawing action and attention to the damaging effects of corruption in developed and developing countries. During her tenure, Secretary Clinton has elevated corruption as a major focus of U.S. foreign policy. She also has promoted the importance of international anti-corruption agreements, including the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention and the U.N. Convention against Corruption, and has worked with the OECD, G8, G20 and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation to combat corruption and promote transparency and accountability.

The remarks will be open to the press.

Pre-set time for cameras: 6:00 p.m. from the Grand Ballroom of the Mayflower Hotel.

Final access time for journalists and still photographers 7:30 p.m. the Grand Ballroom of the Mayflower Hotel.

Media representatives may attend this event upon presentation of one of the following: (1) A U.S. Government-issued identification card (Department of State, White House, Congress, Department of Defense or Foreign Press Center), (2) a media-issued photo identification card, or (3) a letter from their employer on letterhead verifying their employment as a journalist, accompanied by an official photo identification card (driver’s license, passport).

For further information, please contact Laura Taylor at laura@gaiagroupdc.com or (202) 271 8216, or Office of Press Relations, U.S. Department of State, (202) 647-2492.

Hillary visits Tokyo in support of Japan….

In Japan, Madame Secretary Clinton on April 17, 2011 at 9:57 am

Japanese Foreign Minister Takeaki Matsumoto shakes hands with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton prior to meeting at the Iikura Guest House in Tokyo, April 17, 2011. AFP PHOTO / POOL / Saul LOEB

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Sunday that America would stand by Japan, saying she was confident the country will fully recover from its tsunami and nuclear disasters.

“We are very confident that Japan will recover and will be a very strong economic and global player for years and decades to come,” Clinton told Prime Minister Naoto Kan during a brief visit to Tokyo intended as a morale boost to the crucial U.S. ally.

Kan thanked Clinton for U.S. help with the crises triggered by a magnitude-9.0 earthquake on March 11 that unleashed a massive tsunami, wrecking cooling and power systems at a nuclear plant that has been leaking radiation ever since.

“We will never forget and we will keep in our memory that the U.S. has provided such robust support,” said Kan, in comments suggesting the aid has helped soothe friction over an American military base in Okinawa that forced his predecessor, Yukio Hatoyama, to resign last year.

Relief operations mounted by American soldiers after the earthquake and tsunami helped show a new and welcome face for troops the Japanese have hosted — sometimes grudgingly — for decades.

Roughly 20,000 U.S. troops were mobilized in “Operation Tomodachi,” or “Friend,” the biggest bilateral humanitarian mission the U.S. has conducted in Japan. The U.S. is also helping Japan cope with its nuclear crisis.

Kan has pledged to beef up disaster preparedness and make his top priority resolving the crisis at the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.

Tokyo Electric Power Co., the operator of the plant, announced Sunday a plan to bring the crisis under control within six to nine months, aiming to end radiation leaks that have forced the evacuation of tens of thousands of people.

“We would like to see evacuees return to their homes as early as possible,” said TEPCO Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata.

Clinton said Foreign Minister Takeaki Matsumoto, who she met with earlier, told her that Japan hoped for U.S. feedback on the plan.

“The constant efforts to respond to the situation at Fukushima have required intense analysis by Japanese, American and international experts, and we have been very supportive of what Japan is doing to take the appropriate steps,” she said.

Clinton and Matsumoto announced the formation of a public-private partnership to encourage investment in the recovery effort. The aim is to keep American businesses interested in Japan by demonstrating its ability to bounce back from daunting natural disasters.

“There has been a great outpouring of concern, sympathy and admiration for the great resilience and spirit the Japanese people have shown throughout this very difficult experience,” Clinton said.

Clinton, who called Japan’s well-being a “bedrock priority,” also met with the Japanese emperor and empress. She was due to return to the U.S. later Sunday.

“I am so, so sorry for everything your country is going through. If there is anything we can do …” Clinton said to Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, who have been visiting evacuation centers near Tokyo and plan visits to areas hardest hit by the disasters in coming weeks.

http://washingtonexaminer.com/news/world/2011/04/clinton-visits-tokyo-show-support-japan

Secretary Clinton Marks 60th Anniversary of Refugee Convention

In Help for Refugees, Human Rights, Humanitarian Aide, Madame Secretary Clinton on April 6, 2011 at 10:07 pm

 

Courage and Bravery in the interests of Humanity are alive and well.

Secretary Of State Hillary Rodham Clinton On Libya

In Global News, Libya, Madame Secretary Clinton on March 13, 2011 at 10:33 am

Hillary has given N. Korea notice…

In Madame Secretary Clinton, North Korea, Nuclear Weapons, United States on May 21, 2010 at 8:55 pm

Secretary Clinton wishing all mothers, HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY!

In fabulous women, Global News, Madame Secretary Clinton, Smart Power, United States, Women's Day on May 9, 2010 at 1:12 am

 

… And a Happy Mother’s Day to you too, Secretary Clinton.

.. Have a fabulous day-

Hillary, US First Responder to Chilean quake..

In Chile, Madame Secretary Clinton, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, United States on February 28, 2010 at 12:32 am

Earthquake in Chile

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Washington, DC
February 27, 2010

We are closely monitoring reports from Chile and across the Pacific rim, and our thoughts and prayers are with all those who have loved ones affected by this tragedy.

The United States stands ready to provide necessary assistance to Chile in the days and weeks ahead and is coordinating closely with senior Chilean officials on the content and timing of such support. Our Embassy in Santiago has established a command center and is working to ensure the safety of any affected American citizens.

I leave for the region tomorrow and will be in close contact with President Bachelet and other leaders. Our Hemisphere comes together in times of crisis, and we will stand side by side with the people of Chile in this emergency.

This statement from the Bureau of Consular Affairs provides information for those affected by the earthquake and related events.

This information is current as of today:

Sat Feb 27 2010 17:13:46 GMT-0500 (Eastern Standard Time).


Earthquake in Chile: Consular Assistance

* A large earthquake shook Chile at 3:34 a.m. with its epicenter in Chile’s 8th district, 73 miles north of Chile’s secondmost populous city Concepcion and 197 miles south of Santiago. At the epicenter, the quake was measured at 8.8 Richter, at 7.5 in Santiago and shook for an estimate 3 minutes.

* There are rolling blackouts in Santiago, land telephone line service is intermittent and cell phones also appear to be affected

* There have been no reports of American citizen fatalities or injuries. As telephone and email communication becomes dependable, it may be easier to contact family and friends in Chile using SMS (Cell text message) or other forms of social media such as Twitter and Facebook.

* If you are concerned about a U.S. citizen in the affected area and have not been able to reach that person, you can contact the Chile Task Force by email at ChileEarthquake@state.gov. or by calling 1-888-407-4747.

Please provide as much information about the individual (full name, birth date and birth place, location and contact information in Chile, any special circumstances) to assist us in locating the U.S. citizen.

* Chilean officials are asking that, unless there is an emergency need to leave, private citizens should remain in their homes, if not damaged, and stay off the roads.

* The following is a link to the FEMA website with instructions for what to do after an earthquake: http://www.fema.gov/hazard/earthquake/eq_after.shtm.

In short:

• Expect aftershocks. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent.
• Listen to a battery-operated radio or television. Use the telephone only for emergency calls.
• Open cabinets cautiously. Beware of objects that can fall off shelves.

• Stay away from damaged areas. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
• Help injured or trapped persons. Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance.
• Clean up spilled medicines, bleaches, gasoline or other flammable liquids immediately. Leave the area if you smell gas or fumes from other chemicals.
• Inspect the entire length of chimneys for damage. Unnoticed damage could lead to a fire.
• Inspect utilities: Check for gas leaks, look for electrical system damage, check for sewage and water lines damage.

Americans living or traveling in Chile are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration website, https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/ui/ so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Chile. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The U.S. Embassy is located at Avenida Andres Bello 2800, Las Condes, Santiago, Chile, phone number 56-2-330 30 00, fax 56-2-330 30 05,

U.S. Citizen Services Unit email: SantiagoAmcit@state.gov

The Chile earthquake triggered tsunami warnings for the entire Pacific basin. Warden messages are going out to U.S. citizens who have registered their presence with Embassies in the affected countries.

The messages are advising U.S. citizens living near or visiting the coastal areas to take appropriate precautions and monitor tsunami warnings on

http://www.prh.noaa.gov/ptwc/

and http://www.cnn.com, as well as local news sources.