Tellurian

Clinton reprimands Pakistan over lack of action finding al-Qaida leaders…

In bombing, Global News, Madame Secretary Hillary Clinton, Politics, the Taliban and al Qaeda, United States on October 29, 2009 at 8:46 pm

Hillary risks her life for us visiting terrorists countries and all the media can come with is reporting how blunt she is with her criticism, taking the side of leaders hostile to our Foreign Policy representative speaking TRUTH to hypocrisy..I ask you, is msnbc any better than al-Qaida?

Says she finds it ‘hard to believe’ that government can’t find terrorists.

The Peshawar bombing in a market crowded with women and children appeared timed to overshadow her arrival. It was the deadliest attack in Pakistan since 2007.

Hill in Pac

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is escorted by Pakistani Rangers at the Iqbal Memorial in Lahore, Pakistan, on Thursday during a three-day state visit to Pakistan.

ISLAMABAD – U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton chided Pakistani officials Thursday for failing to press the hunt for al-Qaida inside their borders, suggesting they know where the terrorist leaders are hiding.

American officials have long said that al-Qaida mastermind Osama bin Laden and senior lieutenants of the network accused in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks operate out of the rugged terrain along the border with Afghanistan.

But Clinton’s unusually blunt comments went further in asserting that Pakistan’s government has done too little about it.

“I find it hard to believe that nobody in your government knows where they are and couldn’t get them if they really wanted to,” Clinton said in an interview with Pakistani journalists in Lahore. “Maybe that’s the case. Maybe they’re not gettable. I don’t know.”

There was no immediate reaction from Pakistani officials, but the thrust of Clinton’s comments were startling, coming after months of lavish public comments from her and other American officials portraying Pakistan’s leaders as finally receptive to the war against militants inside their own country.

As a political spouse, career public official and recently as a diplomat, Clinton has long showed a tendency toward bluntness, sometimes followed by a softening of her comments. But her remarks about Pakistan’s lack of action against al-Qaida comes at a particularly sensitive moment — amid a major Pakistani offensive against militants and a deadly spate of insurgent violence.

Hill in Pak 2

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton addresses a news conference at the Foreign Ministry in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. Offering sympathy for victims of Wednesday's terrorist bombing, Clinton praised Pakistan's offensive against extremists and pledged U.S. support at a critical point in the country's history.

With Pakistan reeling from Wednesday’s devastating bombing that killed more than 100 people in Peshawar, Clinton also engaged in an intense give-and-take with students at the Government College of Lahore. She insisted that inaction by the government would have ceded ground to terrorists.

“If you want to see your territory shrink, that’s your choice,” she said, adding that she believed it would be a bad choice.

Terrorist ‘masterminds’

Richard Holbrooke, the special U.S. representative on Afghanistan and Pakistan, told reporters that Clinton planned to meet late Thursday with the army chief, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, to get an update on the offensive that began Oct. 17 against Taliban forces in a portion of the tribal areas near the Afghan border.

“We want to encourage them,” Holbrooke said of the Pakistanis. “She wants During her exchange with the Pakistani journalists, one reporter asked Clinton why the fight against terrorism seemed to put Pakistan at the center and why other countries couldn’t do more. Clinton noted that al-Qaida has launched attacks on Indonesia, the Philippines and many other countries over the years.

“So the world has an interest in seeing the capture and killing of the people who are the masterminds of this terrorist syndicate. As far as we know, they are in Pakistan.”

On Clinton’s flight to Islamabad after the interview with Pakistani journalists, U.S. Ambassador Anne Patterson said Clinton’s remarks approximate what the Obama administration has told Pakistani officials in private.

“We often say, `Yes, there needs to be more focus on finding these leaders,'” Patterson said. “The other thing is, they lost control of much of this territory in recent years, and that’s why they’re in South Waziristan right now.”

Hill with Islamist pres

This handout picture released by Pakistan?s Press Information Department on October 28, 2009 shows Pakistan?s President Asif Ali Zardari (R) speaking with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (3L) during a meeting in Islamabad. A huge car bomb ripped through a crowded market in Pakistan on October 28 killing 92 people and underscoring the gravity of the extremist threat destabilising the nuclear-armed Muslim state. The explosion brought down buildings in the northwestern city of Peshawar just hours after US Secretary Hillary Clinton arrived in Pakistan to bolster the two countries' troubled alliance against Taliban and Al-Qaeda militants.

No guarantee

In Lahore, dozens of students rushed to line up for the microphone when the session with Clinton began. Their questions were not hostile, but showed a strong sense of doubt that the U.S. could be a reliable and trusted partner for Pakistan.

One woman asked whether the U.S. could be expected to commit long term in Afghanistan after abandoning the country after Russian occupiers retreated in 1989.

“What guarantee,” the woman asked, “can Americans give Pakistan that we can now trust you — not you but, like, the Americans this time — of your sincerity and that you guys are not going to betray us like the Americans did in the past when they wanted to destabilize the Russians?”

Clinton responded that the question was a “fair criticism” and that the U.S. did not follow through in the way it should have. “It’s difficult to go forward if we’re always looking in the rearview mirror,” said Clinton, on the second of a three-day visit, her first to Pakistan as secretary of state.

Advertisements
  1. I believe Secretary Clinton’s visit accomplished what she set out to do… open dialog between the two countries, air the trust grievances and work towards attainable benchmarks .

    However, Pakistan needs a govt which understands the consequences of supporting terrorism and funding them.

  2. Recent history in Pakistan is similar to events in Iran during the rule of the Shah. Both leaderships were strongly backed by the US, and were involved in widespread repression or attacks on their own people. Both regimes followed policies that were deeply unpopular domestically. In Iran, this led the revolution of 1979 which created an Islamic Republic. Could something similar happen in Pakistan?

    http://watching-history.blogspot.com/2009/10/future-of-pakistan.html

  3. US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s charm offensive rolled into a wall of suspicion at one of Pakistan’s top universities on Thursday as students grilled her on whether America was truly ready to be a steadfast partner in a time of crisis.Mrs Clinton, on the second day of a three-day visit aimed at turning around a US-Pakistan relationship under serious strain, was presented with stark evidence of the ‘trust deficit’ that yawns between the two countries, now bound together in the struggle against religious extremism.

    http://ahraza.wordpress.com/2009/10/29/university-students-in-lahore-confront-hillary

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: